Local In Season
Asparagus Pesto Print
Right Food for the Season - Late Spring
Written by Michelle Collins   
Dinners in my house growing up were always eaten around the table, and made in batches large enough to feed a small crowd. My mother always made sure we had a hot meal to eat together as a family on a nightly basis. Due to our financial limitations, dinners were also kept simple, and the variety of foods we consumed was slim. My siblings and I used to love picking the ripe tomatoes for dinner out of our small, slightly pathetic backyard vegetable garden, and the wild blueberries that grew in random patches were always plucked with pleasure. But we really never had a lot of different foods – just affordable, approachable, “safe” options.
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Pesto: Not Just for Basil Anymore Print
Features - The Craft of Cooking
Written by Karen Covey   
Pestos are one of the quickest and easiest sauces you can make and a perfect technique to add to your skill set. But if you think basil is the only way to go, then think again. I've created pestos out of a lot of things and some of my favorites include arugula pesto, spinach pesto and cilantro pesto. Everything gets put into a food processor and you have yourself a simple sauce in no time.
 
The trick is to blend up the produce first, along with the garlic, salt and pepper and the cheese, in this case really good Parmigiano-Reggiano. Once you have it all finely mixed then you want to slowly stream in the olive oil to blend it into a nice paste. It's a great thing to make in a larger batch and freeze in small, individual containers for later use.
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Plum Almond Bread Print
Right Food for the Season - Late Summer
Written by Michelle Collins   

I recently made the move from Arlington to Somerville, expecting more of a city life and even less of a chance of being able to enjoy fresh produce on a regular basis. An innocent walk down my new street one of the first days after my move, though, proved me terribly wrong – thanks to our neighbor with the lush, abundant garden at the end of our street.

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For confidentiality’s sake, we’ll call this neighbor Greg. Greg grows a wide variety of fruits and vegetables on his small plot of land, including tomatoes, grapes and plums. Greg loves to share his homegrown foods, and takes pride in what he and his garden produce. As luck would have it, I happened to walk by Greg just as he was preparing his garden for Hurricane Irene – and I walked home, gleefully, with an armful of fresh plums.

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LIS Quickpost: Beet Garlic Scape Slaw Print
Right Food for the Season - Early Summer
Written by Leif Green   

I can't get enough of garlic scapes when they are around, so I find ways to incorporate them into just about everything.  My rule is: buy now, figure out what to do with them later.

Here's a suggestion: Look at your bunch of beets, count them, and make sure you have 2 garlic scapes for every one beet. This ratio, plus a little olive oil and salt and pepper, will create a terrific, versatile slaw.

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Local Libations: Slumbrew Print
Features - Local Libations
Written by Michelle Collins   

I recently moved to Somerville. The younger population, hip vibe and active lifestyle were just a few of the reasons I set up home here. The fact that this city now brews its own beer is just one giant bonus.

Slumbrew is the research and development brand of Somerville Brewing Company. Founded as a result of 15 years of beer research and tasting by Caitlin Jewell and Jeff Leiter, Slumbrew “provides an opportunity to experiment with innovative local ingredients to produce craft beers that stand apart from typical formulations.”

Slumbrew currently has three beers on the market: Porter Square Porter, Flagraiser IPA and, the one highlighted here today, Happy Sol. Happy Sol is an unfiltered wheat beer brewed with local wildflower honey, orange peel, coriander and the juice from over 1,000 blood oranges. 

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What's In Season? 

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